European CEO of the Year

European CEO of the Year nominees:

1. Jacques Aschenbroich (Valeo)

Former French civil servant Jacques Aschenbroich joined the private sector in 1988. He worked for Saint-Gobain for 20 years, where he managed subsidiaries in Brazil and Germany, and later served as vice-chairman and delegate general to the US. He joined Valeo, an automotive supplier in 2009, where he implemented a new strategic plan focusing on emerging markets and technologies to reduce CO2 emissions. Find out more: https://www.valeo.com/en/jacques-aschenbroich/  

2. Ana Botin (Santander)

Ana Botin has been in charge of Banco Santander, Spain’s biggest bank, since the death of her father in 2014. The family has helmed the bank for the past 100 years and now counts some 200,000 employees and 131 million customers worldwide. Botin pulled off a major coup last year when she bought Banco Popular, a local rival close to bankruptcy, for a nominal €1. Find out more: https://www.santander.com/csgs/Satellite/CFWCSancomQP01/es_ES/Corporativo/Relacion-con-Inversores/Dª-Ana-Botin-Sanz-de-Sautuola-y-OShea.html?leng=en_GB  

3. Stéphane Israël (Arianespace)

An expert in public economics and the space industry, Stephane Israel became chief executive of Arianespace, the world’s leading satellite launch services company, in 2013 after several stints in the French civil service. Under his leadership, the company has successfully weathered the emergence of multiple new competitors and delivered some of its strongest years on record. Find out more: http://www.arianespace.com/contact/stephane-israel-bio/  

4. Laurence Kemball-Cook (Pavagen)

British entrepreneur Laurence Kemball-Cook launched Pavagen in 2010 shortly after graduating from university. The clean-tech company, which created a patented floor tile that converts human footsteps into energy, has secured projects with some of the leading companies around the world - including Coca-Cola and Nike - and installed its tech in places such as Washington DC and Rio. Projects with Google and Transport for London are in the pipeline. Find out more: https://twitter.com/laurencekc?lang=en  

5. Edyta Kocyk (SiDLY)

Polish entrepreneur Edyta Kocyk launched her business SiDLY in 2014 out of necessity. Her grandmother was sick and concerned for her well-being. The PhD designed a telemedical wristband which is now used in some of Europe’s clinics and hospitals. Find out more: http://sidly.eu/en/about-sidly/the-management-board  

6. Lisa Lang (ElektroCouture)

Lisa Lang launched ElektroCouture, a fashion tech start-up, in 2014 after making a jacket with LEDs and its own phone number so that a text message would change the lights’ colour. Since then the team has grown to 22 and has worked on multiple bespoke collaborations with designers and brands including ASOS. Find out more: https://twitter.com/lilaineurope?lang=en  

7. Likka Paananen (Supercell)

Finnish serial entrepreneur Ilkka Paananen co-founded Supercell in 2010. Since then the mobile game developer has brought four games to market - including Clash of Titans - which have amassed 100 million daily players and opened offices San Francisco, Tokyo, Seoul and Shanghai. In 2016, Supercell became the first European tech start-up to reach a valuation of over $10 billion. Find out more: http://supercell.com/en/our-story/  

8. Gilian Tans (Booking.com)

In 2002, Gillian Tans left a secure position as head of marketing for a major global hotel group to join Booking.com, a company with a small footprint in its native Netherlands. Since then, it has expanded to more than 15,000 employees in nearly 200 offices around the world to become the world’s biggest accommodation booking site. She was appointed CEO in April 2016. Find out more: https://globalnews.booking.com/gillian-tans/